15
December
December 2015(EDITION 6, Volume 52)
 
Written By: Kanwal Kiani
The month of December symbolizes our firm resolve as a nation to effectively respond and overcome the challenge posed to our security, peace and progress. Pakistan Armed Forces....Read full article
 
Written By: Feryal Ali Gauhar
There is no one here, for mile upon endless mile, the horizon an elusive line moving further away from us as the helicopter hovers over patches of rust and ochre and fecund green, fields once tended by farmers who lived in the now....Read full article
 
Written By: Rizwan Asghar
In the post-9/11 period, efforts to reduce nuclear dangers in South Asia have largely remained focused on Pakistan but it is an unfortunate fact that the international community seems to have turned a blind....Read full article
 
Written By: Waqar K Kauravi
Non Kinetic Warfare (NKW) has not been defined so far in a wholesome manner. It plays in the cognitive and cyber domains focusing on belief, desire, idea, knowledge and motivation with ability to affect common people and strategic....Read full article
 
Written By: Amir Zia
So where does Pakistan stand in its make-or-break struggle against religiously-motivated extremism and terrorism? Are we somewhere close to victory against this “internal enemy” or need....Read full article
 
Written By: Maj Kanwal Kiani
And If we don’t come back, tell them we have sacrificed our today for their tomorrow…We used to read this motivational line about the courageous guardians in uniform... today the milieu has been altered by the so called loyalists of Islam who want to implement their fantasized....Read full article
 
Written By: Saima Baig
Winter with a bitter cold has arrived, the leaves have slowly began to fall. The sun has been replaced by the harsh raw winds in the morning, all that was bounteous is now barren. The city of flowers, Peshawar, has once again become the city of....Read full article
 
Written By: Fareeha Idrees
Sleep my darling sleep Here, put your tired head on my shoulder I sing a lullaby As his cold body turned colder…. London Bridge is falling down....Read full article
 
Written By: Dr. Ahmad Rashid Malik
There is no iota of doubt in stating that India was central to the crisis and separation of former East Paksitan when Chanakya Kautilya’s philosophy came into full swing in 1971. However, Chanakya also advises that “never share your secrets....Read full article
 
Interviews: Maria Khalid
It was not Pakistan Army or military action on 25 March that unleashed violence against Bengalis. Armed militants mostly belonging to the Awami League were already working on violent methods to target forces....Read full article
 
Written By: Lt Col Amer Islam
“Bhairab Bazar Bridge over River Meghna is critically important for us”, Major General Raheem Khan, GOC 14 Division told the Commanding Officer of 1 Commando Battalion Lt. Col Abdul Shakoor Jan in a measured tone. “The rebels will try to blow this bridge....Read full article
 
Written By: Dr. Kamal Monnoo
Pakistan's economic leadership and, especially, the Ministry of Commerce needs to realize that modern day global trade is changing course. Gone are the days when countries single mindedly were focused on expansion of trade....Read full article
 
Written By: Syed Sajid Bukhari
“No one can defeat a nation that has daughters like Marium,” said Air Chief Marshal Sohail Aman on Marium’s martyrdom. Marium Mukhtiar was born on May 18, 1992 in Karachi and she was the second eldest among her two siblings....Read full article
 
Written By: Prof: Sharif al Mujahid
ALL said and done, 1937 represents the major watershed in Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah’s (1876-1948) public life, which spanned for over four decades (1904-48). For that year marked a radical shift in his posture and....Read full article

 
Written By: Maj Arshad Iqbal
Wars despite all the vices have the virtue of bringing out the best of men. 1971 War which ended up in disintegration of our motherland, left an everlasting mark on our national memory. While there were numerous episodes of defections and disloyalty....Read full article
 
Written By: Maria Khalid
Pakistan was not monolithic – split into two parts but undivided. East and West Pakistan were geographically remote from each other, divided by thousands of miles of Indian territory. It was the year 1971 when Fareed-ud-Din, having a Bengali....Read full article
 
Written By: Brig. Dr. Tanvir Akhtar
Emotions are ubiquitous in the workplace and in recent years the ideal of the non-emotional workplace emoticsthat1.jpg has slowly and gradually given way to the realization that emotions not only are an indelible....Read full article
 
Written By: Ashir Azeem
We are celebrating the re-birth of cinema in Pakistan. We "hope" that we will continue to make more quality films, and cinemas will continue to grow in number. Today we have 46 cinemas with 86 screens and are hoping to produce....Read full article
 
Written By: Ardon Josher
Christmas celebrations are incomplete without its significant colours. Red, green and golden brighten our houses, Churches and we decorate each corner to show the warmth of Christmas. Each colour has its own significance....Read full article
 
Written By: Gauher Aftab
Comic Strip....Read full article
 
 
A high level Chinese Military delegation headed by General Fan Changlong, Vice Chairman of Central Military Commission of the People’s Republic of China visited Pakistan after a lapse of eleven years on November 12, 2015. On arrival at GHQ.....Read full article
 
The Pakistan-made Super Mushshak aircraft took off to the skies to perform aerobatics at the Dubai Air Show in the presence of international media and public. The crowd was thrilled by the aerobatic performance....Read full article
 
Pakistan Navy’s major maritime exercise SEASPARK-2015 was conducted in North Arabian Sea with the objective to corroborate PN operational plans, assess war preparedness of Pakistan Navy and enhance interoperability with PAF and Pak Army....Read full article
 
Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif visited Pakistan’s Centre of Excellence for Nuclear Security (PCENS) on November 13, and witnessed its state-of-the-art facilities and ongoing training activities. While lauding the high standards of professionalism and commitment....Read full article
 
A delegation of 91 students from National University of Modern Languages spent a day with soldiers of Pak Army at Lahore Garrison. The day long programme was specifically organised to sensitize the students on security, self defence and also to enlighten them on operational.....Read full article
 
 
14
December

Written By: Ashir Azeem

We are celebrating the re-birth of cinema in Pakistan. We "hope" that we will continue to make more quality films, and cinemas will continue to grow in number. Today we have 46 cinemas with 86 screens and are hoping to produce 20 films per year. Hope is essential for all human endeavours, the difference between winners and losers is that, on the winner's long list of things to do, hope is the last item. On the loser's list, it is the only item.

 

Back in late 80s we had 750 cinemas, and were making 80 films a year; 25 years later we are being reborn. What happened? Why didn't we make it then? Will we make it this time? Have we learnt anything from history? Are we doing anything different now?


Being an analyst I have few bad habits: I think; I ask questions; I try to learn from history; I look for other countries’ experiences; and, I try to plan for the future. Is the current wave of a few overzealous producers taking exorbitant risks with their time and money, facing uncertainty of profits, sustainable in the future? Is growth of cinemas the same thing as growth of film industry? Do profits for cinema owners and distributors translate into profits for producers, actors and crew? If we have to pick one then who would be more important for growth of film industry – the cinema owner, the distributor or the film maker? Is the present equation between the three optimal, equitable and sustainable? Will it translate into a robust film industry? Do we need a regulatory framework? Are there regulatory frameworks in other countries? But before we start seeking answers to these questions, let's ask the basic question. Why do we need the film industry, at all?


In May 1994, the Presidential Advisory Council on Science & Technology reported to South Korean President, Kim Young-sam that the profits from the film Jurassic Park equalled the export revenues of 1.5 million Hyundai cars that South Korea exported that year (New Korean Cinema by Chi-Yun Shin). India has 13,000 cinemas with 45 million tickets sold daily. Foreign film share in Indian cinema is 10%. The Indian media and entertainment industry has registered annual revenues in excess of 25 Billion US Dollars (Ernst & Young).

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Film industry is part of what is called the creative industry. It is an industry which needs minimum input and infrastructure yet yields revenues that far surpass any other industry. The revenues that are generated from this industry are not concentrated into a few hands but are shared by a wide spectrum of people ranging from actors, singers, musicians, writers, crew, post-production video and audio studios, producers, distributors and cinema owners. It is truly a democratic industry with few barriers to entry, it is open to anyone with a stroke of brilliance.


If you take creativity out of a creative industry, what are you left with? Exactly, what we were left with 25 years ago – empty cinemas, of course, unless we are planning on having cinemas which will make money from Pakistani audience while enriching foreign film industry.


It is said that Hollywood is an extension of U.S. foreign policy as clearly indicated by Sally Totman in her book, How Hollywood Projects Foreign Policy: “The association between the change in Libyan status in U.S. Foreign Policy and the changing role of Libya in U.S. films is significant.” It has also been observed by Jean-Michel Valantin, a sociologist and defence analyst, that the history of relationships between the American State and strategy is also that of communication between Washington and Hollywood, which constantly transforms the application of American strategic practices into cinematic accounts.


Similarly as stated by Former Indian Minister Shashi Tharoor: “today it is not the size of the army or of the economy that matters, but the country that tells the ‘better story’. Components of India’s soft power are as diverse as yoga, ayurveda, political pluralism, religious diversity and openness to global influences, all ideas successfully exported through Bollywood across the world.”


The greatest power in the world is the ability to influence human mind. Film and television are prime mediums to influence not only the thought of domestic population but to reach out to a global audience. Pakistan is unfortunately, not only unable to reach out to global audience, but we have completely surrendered our own population to foreign influence and destroyed our existing film and television industry. Anyone who feels that films are nothing but entertainment, is completely missing the point. Film is a very serious business.


Film industry starts with the film maker. The film maker is the heart of the industry, the creativity behind the creative industry; he produces the products that are sold by the distributors to the shops that display it – the cinemas. The distributors and cinemas are certainly important but these are essentially salesmen and infrastructures, without a good film maker, the best of salesmen and the best of cinemas are useless.


Unfortunately due to lack of regulatory framework, we are killing the film maker; the very person that makes it all happen. Today the film maker is systematically being destroyed, after extreme hard work, exorbitant financial risks, and despite producing an excellent product, the film maker is unable to break even. The equation is such that 50% of ticket revenue is kept by the cinema, and almost 30% by the distributor and the media partner. The 20% that the film maker gets after years of hard work doesn’t even cover the expenses and this is given to him as piecemeal almost a year after the release of the film. Can a film industry survive under such conditions? Will any amount of hope fix the fundamental problems? Is anyone doing anything about this?


Having access to the second most spoken language in the world, Pakistan has a huge advantage. We are the only country which can compete with the largest film industry in the world, Bollywood, and can not only earn revenues from India, Middle East, Europe and North American markets that have substantial Urdu/Hindi speaking communities, but can also counter the Indian influence and soft power. This threat is obvious to the Indian policy makers who are actively engaged in producing films that are designed to penetrate Pakistan's market by either employing Pakistani actors, writers and musicians, dealing with subjects that are attractive to Pakistani viewers or supplying their films to Pakistani distributors at unreasonably low rates. The concept is to capture maximum Pakistani audience and earn huge revenues in Pakistan, while denying Pakistani films access not only to Indian markets, but also to Pakistani markets.

 

The writer is an actor and script writer, famous for drama serial ‘Dhuan’ (1992).
Having access to the second most spoken language in the world, Pakistan has a huge advantage. We are the only country which can compete with the largest film industry in the world, Bollywood, and can not only earn revenues from India, Middle East, Europe and North American markets that have substantial Urdu/Hindi speaking communities, but can also counter the Indian influence and soft power. This threat is obvious to the Indian policy makers who are actively engaged in producing films that are designed to penetrate Pakistan's market by either employing Pakistani actors, writers and musicians, dealing with subjects that are attractive to Pakistani viewers or supplying their films to Pakistani distributors at unreasonably low rates. The concept is to capture maximum Pakistani audience and earn huge revenues in Pakistan, while denying Pakistani films access not only to Indian markets, but also to Pakistani markets.

*****

The greatest power in the world is the ability to influence human mind. Film and television are prime mediums to influence not only the thought of domestic population but to reach out to a global audience. Pakistan is unfortunately, not only unable to reach out to global audience, but we have completely surrendered our own population to foreign influence and destroyed our existing film and television industry. Anyone who feels that films are nothing but entertainment, is completely missing the point. Film is a very serious business.

*****

 
14
December

Written By: Brig. Dr. Tanvir Akhtar

Emotions are ubiquitous in the workplace and in recent years the ideal of the non-emotional workplace emoticsthat1.jpg has slowly and gradually given way to the realization that emotions not only are an indelible part of work life but have an important and inevitable part to play. Normally emotions at the workplace are divided into productive and counterproductive behaviours. Those sentiments which are conducive to the objectives and goals of an organization can increase creativity and productivity, encourage helping behaviours and cooperation. Peak performers know how to manage their emotions and do not let themselves sweeped away by the internal emotional state. Emotions have three components:-

 A common thought persists that emotions emoticsthat2.jpg are negative and they always make you their victim and the primitive instinct dominates you when you are emotional. Psychologically speaking this is not the case as emotions are the triggers which make you respond effectively towards life and your work. The prominent characteristics of emotions are:

 

There are emotions that enhance our work productivity. All of us are aware of the fact that care, understanding and joy make the working environment more plausible but what about anxiousness, anger, fear and sadness? Let’s discuss how these factors can play a constructive and beneficial role:-

 

Anxiousness: This, in other words, is eagerness or nervousness. Can you think of completing a job for which you are not eager? Can you imagine that you have to present a case or give a presentation to your seniors and you are not nervous? Both the components of anxiousness or anxiety are necessary for the preparedness to react to whatever may come our way. Anxiety is also considered as one of the psychological ailments and a bundle of drugs are prescribed by the psychiatrists for it. These are only prescribed when anxiety is affecting your normal functioning at office or home. On the other hand, if it remains in the normal boundaries or limits then it offers assurance of success. This emotion instilled in us acts as a trigger and we remain productive at our work environments. We have to calm our nerves and tell ourselves that this is the readiness to react and act in a befitting manner.

 

Anger: Anger can be a very negative emotion which is not only thought to be injurious socially but also has physiological deterrents for the health of individuals. All religions admonish being angry. Many philosophers, saints have written and issued sermons against this emotion. But have you ever thought about the things a child does wrong and parents get angry for? This anger is universally accepted for betterment of the child. Implying this at work can be a normal emotion, it takes toll on our nerves but in fact it facilitates approach-oriented behaviour. Our actions always move towards a goal, object or idea. Many researchers have indicated that anger might actually make individuals act more rationally, suggesting that it can be a motivator of analytical thought rather than an obstacle. It is a known fact that strict bosses are more productive and make the team exert effectively.

 

Fear: Whenever in danger, one emotion that acts as a shield is fear. It is a powerful motivator that helps us stay safe when we sense danger. As long as fear becomes overwhelming or irrational it is a positive motivator for safety. It is fear which keeps you on toes with your work. Fear can be of the annual report, a positive nod of the boss, promotion and many such attributes which are the deterrents apparently but actually are the motivators for you to work. Fear serves a purpose, you just have to channel it to your work effectively as it is a social motivator that keeps you in check and in perspective.


Sorrow: When one is sad he/she tends to ponder more than normal and think more critically. Sadness at work may slow down the productivity but has a positive effect on the quality. Serious people are more workaholic. When one is sad he/she tends to be less biased in decision making. One thinks little more slowly and deliberately and is also likely to act more fairly and less selfishly.


Aforementioned emotions especially labelled as negative are not harmful for the work environment but they act as energizers and help us focus on the completion of tasks assigned to us. So this range of emotions (within limits) may not be discounted, rather they provide an analytical worker with analytical qualities within the time frame and in the given circumstances.

By understanding true value of emotions and its manifestations, an employee can reach the goals of an organization and a leader can optimize the performance of his people.

*****

Have you ever thought about the things a child does wrong and parents get angry for? This anger is universally accepted for betterment of the child. Implying this at work can be a normal emotion, it takes toll on our nerves but in fact it facilitates approach-oriented behaviour. Our actions always move towards a goal, object or idea. Many researchers have indicated that anger might actually make individuals act more rationally, suggesting that it can be a motivator of analytical thought rather than an obstacle. It is a known fact that strict bosses are more productive and make the team exert effectively.

*****

 
14
December

Written By: Maria Khalid

Pakistan was not monolithic – split into two parts but undivided. East and West Pakistan were geographically remote from each other, divided by thousands of miles of Indian territory. It was the year 1971 when Fareed-ud-Din, having a Bengali origin, got commission in Pakistan Army as a lieutenant and joined 55 Field Regiment located in Kharian as an artillery gunner.


Till date, he proudly presents himself as a product of Faujdarhat Cadet College located on the outskirts of Chittagong, modeled on the public schools in UK. “During Ayub regime lots of economic, administrative and social measures were taken which were aimed at larger national integration, minimizing the disparity between East and West Pakistan. They were given resources and cadet colleges were established. “Studying in this prestigious institution gave me direction and I knew I wanted to join Pakistan Army.”


When I asked him the reason to stay in Pakistan after the 1971 war even though he is a Bengali, he told me about his wife who belonged to Model Town Lahore, a cavern of longing opened up inside of him triggering a minor epiphany at the same time. “Also I took oath on Holy Quran in Kakul and promised loyalty to Pakistan until the very end.” His loyalty was put to a great test from March till December but he remained loyal and came over to Pakistan after the creation of Bangladesh. Many Bengali officers revolted and joined the rebel forces clandestinely or openly and there were many instances where they remained loyal till the end of the war in 1971.


“I received a lot of love and affection in Pakistan Army. They recognized my sacrifice and supported me wherever I served. Army Welfare Trust gave me benefits much more than others.”


His son, Major Ali Raza was serving as an instructor in Pakistan Army Aviation. While he was testing a refurbished aircraft, the engine ceased at a very short altitude on April 8, 2014. “That was a huge loss for me. But he died for a very good cause. The pangs in my heart are a constant reminder of the loss but it gives me solace that he died boots on and I always pray to Allah to give him the best place in heavens.” A month before his martyrdom, a post on his Facebook wall said, “Keep your head high. Allah selects the best soldiers for Allah’s toughest battle.” With this he gave me a polite little smile that reached his eyes. He is proud of all his sons, the one who sacrificed himself for Pakistan, the one who serves in Pakistan Army Engineering Corps and the one who is studying abroad.


“This friendship, this comradeship doesn’t know any bounds. I remember when we were told to swim across Bambawali-Ravi-Bedian Canal in the month of December; I did it without any hesitation. The then COAS and President Gen Zia ul Haq, asked the General Officer Commanding (GOC), “how did he do it?” I told him I was born in water, i.e., in East Pakistan. That was when he directed his Staff Officer to note down my name and he took special interest in my welfare later on. President Zia asked me, “Which place would you like to get settled after the retirement?” I replied, “all parts of Pakistan are dear to me, sir.”


He believes the separation of Bangladesh was a political blunder. “During the 24 years of a united Pakistan, economic disparity and other inequalities posed a serious challenge to the unity which was fully exploited by the enemy. A tropical cyclone that struck East Pakistan on November 12, 1970 killed 50,000 people with winds reaching up to 144km/h. Transferring of military helicopters was made difficult by the Indian government as they didn’t grant them the clearance required to cross the Indian territory lying between the two wings of Pakistan. The elections were scheduled a month ahead of the cyclone. General Yahya was criticized for delayed handling of relief operations. Sympathy votes were cast for Mujib-ur-Rehman and that changed the whole scenario.


Separated for thousand miles by a hostile nation, the Bengalis had developed trust deficit and by then no leader could visualize that it would take such an ugly turn. “They never contemplated this possibility. People voted for Mujib-ur-Rehman but for a united Pakistan. General Yahya Khan wanted to bring Mujib-ur-Rehman and Zulfikar Ali Bhutto together to run the government but civil war broke out. As a matter of fact more than 60% Bengalis supported United Pakistan.”


When Sheikh Mujib-ur-Rehman announced a parallel government on March 7, 1971, Army was incarcerated inside the cantonment. They were confined to the barracks by the Awami League during their hate campaign against West Pakistan. Now under influence of negative propaganda, Bengali shopkeepers refused to sell them food, fuel and other everyday commodities. “We were prisoners inside the camps; Awami League demanded the troops be sent back to the barracks.”


Misunderstandings grew, atmosphere became tense, and lawlessness was everywhere. India cashed in the refugee crisis and restrained them from returning home when they had grown tired of their expatriate life, otherwise their cause to attack East Pakistan due to the growing refugee influx would be lost.


In the late 70s, Col Fareed-ud-Din’s unit moved to East Pakistan. He remembers how Army as an organized force under strict command from its officers only wanted to kill the insurgents under unfavorable operational situation but they saw everything taking a wrong turn due to the Indian intervention. Pakistan Army found itself in a difficult situation. People asked why our soldiers didn’t start a guerilla warfare. He asks with utter disbelief at the ignorance, “Where would the equipment come from, suppose a soldier fired the only round he had, what would come next when all our ammunition was exhausted? Our meager forces of approximately 33,000 soldiers were facing a rebel force of 100,000 and approximately 500,000 Indian soldiers.”


“An air of dogmatism was dominant in newspapers. The untrammeled partisan media of the separatist ideology gained high ground in the international forum because of Pakistan’s poor press coverage.”


He added, “J. N. Dixit in his book, Liberation and Beyond: Indo-Bangladesh Relations mentioned how Indira Gandhi called a meeting in April and ordered Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw to wage war in East Pakistan. The General bargained for time as he needed time for preparation and he knew East Pakistan was submerged in water during the monsoon season.” The density of rain between April and September went up to 1,854 millimeters. A major military operation would not be feasible until winters arrived.


When the war broke out, India took calculated moves as our locations were known to them. “We couldn’t fight a classical war because of paucity of troops and heavy equipment. We were confined to limited resources. The local people were hostile; movement from one sector to another was difficult. A dense network of rivers with numerous large and small tributaries made cross-country movement difficult as narrow roads frequently ended on river banks and from there boats remained the only possible mode of transportation. No aircraft would come for our rescue and we were dependent on an obsolete tank regiment. Indians waged war with a tactical scheme which involved knowing our troops’ location and attacking through the gaps. They knew where our troops were concentrated and the fall back positions. Our communication lines were also compromised.”


“The officers who defected our forces and joined the rebels across the border took along the operational plans of the war. 100,000 Mukti Bahini operating behind our lines were providing real time intelligence to the enemy.”


East Pakistan was surrounded by India on all sides except a very small border with Burma. Due to this peculiar cartography, geography was against us. The distances involved in two wings were too large and duly exploited by India. Besides dismemberment of Pakistan was a huge strategic gain and in India’s national interest therefore Pakistan’s internal situation was badly exploited to achieve the said objective.


When I asked Col Fareed-ud-Din if he had any regrets that he stayed in Pakistan, he replied, “History still weighs on us but I am proud to have come to West Pakistan. I miss my relatives and family but I vowed to live and die in Pakistan. My beloved wife is buried here, with whom I have a deep emotional attachment. I found genuine pleasure in her companionship. We lived a very happy and fulfilling life.” At that thought a wave of absolute calm engulfed him.


“East and West Pakistan were one but the situation so developed that we had to separate. A day will come when we will reunite.” In his mind he pictures it as two leaves blown apart by a merciless gust of wind but genuinely bound together by the entwined roots of the tree they fell from.

The story of an unsung hero; a valiant Bengali officer who chose to stay in Pakistan after separation of East Pakistan in 1971. He left all his kins in Bangladesh to uphold his oath of love and loyalty to Pakistan and Pakistan Armed Forces. His son many years later joined Pakistan Army, actively took part in war against terrorism and laid his life in the line of duty in 2013. The late wife of this officer was also laid to rest in Pakistan. It is an account of unconditional love for Pakistan and Pakistan Army. However, keeping in view the ongoing targeting and victimization back there – who are ‘alleged’ for their loyalty towards a united country in 1971 – the names used in this story were changed to avoid any harm to other family members living there.

*****

 
14
December
Students’ Day Out with Pakistan Army
 
A delegation of 91 students from National University of Modern Languages spent a day with soldiers of Pak Army at Lahore Garrison. The day long programme was specifically organised to sensitize the students on security, self defence and also to enlighten them on operational preparedness of Pak Army. The students evinced keen interest in the programme and commended the sacrifices and resolve of Pakistan Army in the ongoing war against terrorism. They also thanked COAS General Raheel Sharif for providing them a life time experience and opportunity to know Pakistan Army.
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14
December
COAS Visit to SPD
 
Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif visited Pakistan’s Centre of Excellence for Nuclear Security (PCENS) on November 13, and witnessed its state-of-the-art facilities and ongoing training activities. While lauding the high standards of professionalism and commitment of the Strategic Plans Division (SPD) security forces, entrusted with safeguarding Pakistan’s strategic assets, COAS expressed full confidence in Pakistan’s nuclear security regime. While interacting with officers and troops, COAS said: “ the nuclear security is a sacred responsibility and I am glad to see that it has been instilled as a culture and the progress made in the recent past is praiseworthy.”
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14
December
Pn Exercise Seaspark 2015
 
Pakistan Navy’s major maritime exercise SEASPARK-2015 was conducted in North Arabian Sea with the objective to corroborate PN operational plans, assess war preparedness of Pakistan Navy and enhance interoperability with PAF and Pak Army. All operational units of Pakistan Navy including ships, submarines, aircraft, UAVs, Special Forces and Pak Marines along with elements of PMSA, PAF and Pak Army participated in the exercise. During the exercise, full spectrum of threats was exercised ranging from conventional to asymmetric, cyber and information warfare domains.
 
Besides enhancement of operational preparedness, the exercise also focused on seaward defence of the coast and response against emerging non-traditional threats emanating from sea. On the occasion of Fleet Review by Pakistan Navy, Prime Minister Muhammad Nawaz Sharif witnessed the wide ranging naval manoeuvres by an array of naval combat platforms in North Arabian Sea. The Prime Minister reposed complete trust and confidence in the operational capabilities of Pakistan Navy and urged that the challenges at hand necessitate eternal vigilance to safeguard against external and internal threats.
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14
December
PAF Super Mushshak Thrills the Crowd at Dubai Air Show
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The Pakistan-made Super Mushshak aircraft took off to the skies to perform aerobatics at the Dubai Air Show in the presence of international media and public. The crowd was thrilled by the aerobatic performance, maneuverability and stability of the indigenously developed light aircraft. The spectators appreciated the performance of PAF aerobatics team and gave them a thunderous applause.
14
December
CHINESE DELEGATION VISIT TO PAKISTAN
 
A high level Chinese Military delegation headed by General Fan Changlong, Vice Chairman of Central Military Commission of the People’s Republic of China visited Pakistan after a lapse of eleven years on November 12, 2015. On arrival at GHQ the visiting dignitary laid floral wreath at Yadgar-e-Shuhuda and paid rich tribute to Shuhada of Pakistan. The delegation met COAS General Raheel Sharif. The meeting was followed by high level talks between delegations of both countries and matters of mutual interest, regional security-stability and enhanced bilateral defence collaboration were discussed. General Fan Changlong particularly expressed his appreciation for the role played by General Raheel Sharif in realizing CPEC and strengthening relationship between China and Pakistan.
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